Was Able To In A Sentence?

Can or could you please?

If taken literally, “Can you” is equivalent to asking the person if they’re capable of doing something.

“Could you”, on the other hand, implies that the action can be completed under some circumstances by the person.

The usage of can you is idiomatic, and hence, is more popular used phrase of the two..

Could is past or present?

Could is used for past and future instances, or sometimes in the present tense (although in the present tense it is normally describing a possibility or is part of a question). For example, She spoke so fast that I could not hear her, or, he could do it if he chooses to. In the present, we use can.

What to use with did have or had?

As you know had is the past participle form and did is the simple past. So normally had is used in past perfect or continious.

Was were able to sentences?

We use was/were able to to talk about a specific event in the past. Examples: It was very windy last weekend so I could sail my boat very fast. Last Saturday evening it was raining so he didn’t go for a walk.

How can I use did in a sentence?

To make a question in the Past Tense in English we normally put the auxiliary DID at the beginning of the question or before the main subject.DID is used with regular AND irregular verbs in English. … Don’t and Doesn’t are used in negative sentences with all verbs EXCEPT To Be and Modal verbs (Can, might, should etc.).More items…•

Can have been?

While Can’t Have (Been) is used to refer to an incident in the near past, Couldn’t Have (Been) is used for an event that happened way back in the past. When it comes to modal verbs — the verbs that express necessity or possibility — many learners find them rather confusing.

Can could tenses?

Can is called a modal verb. It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle. When a past participle is needed, the expression be able to is used instead.

Will and would sentences examples?

For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email.

How do you use able to in a sentence?

be able to for abilityI have been able to swim since I was five. (present perfect)You will be able to speak perfect English very soon. (future simple)I would like to be able to fly an airplane. (infinitive)

Were able or was able?

It is the conjugated verb ‘to be’ + the adverb ‘able’ + the infinitive ‘to’. … But you should only use ‘was/were able to’ with action verbs to talk about an ability related to a single event or incident in the past. Examples: I was able to surprise my teacher yesterday.

Can and could grammar?

We use can and can’t to talk about the ability to do something at a specific time in the present or future: … We use could and couldn’t to talk about the past: She could speak several languages.

Can you end a sentence with did?

It’s not an error to end a sentence with a preposition, but it is a little less formal. In emails, text messages, and notes to friends, it’s perfectly fine. But if you’re writing a research paper or submitting a business proposal and you want to sound very formal, avoid ending sentences with prepositions.

Can and Cannot sentences?

We use Can when we have the ability, time or will to do something. For example: I can play the guitar. … We use Cannot (or Can’t) when we don’t have the ability, the time or the will to do something. For example: I cannot sing.

Could you VS would you?

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can). And according to the American Heritage Dictionary, “would” is used to make a polite request.

Which form of verb is used with had?

This tense is formed with the past tense form of “to have” (HAD) plus the past participle of the verb (which can be either regular or irregular in form): I had walked two miles by lunchtime. I had run three other marathons before entering the Boston Marathon .